News

Occupy London - one year on

in

A year ago this week 250 activists descended on St Paul’s Cathedral to protest against banker excesses and corporate greed which precipitated global financial collapse.

Formed in solidarity with the Occupy Wall Street movement, Occupy London aimed to highlight the injustices of the economic recession generated by the wealthiest 1%.

Frankie Boyle not a racist?

in

I don’t know whether or not Frankie Boyle is a racist. I don’t know him, never met him before. What I can say without fear or favour is that to make a joke about a mixed heritage non-white child with a disability, that panders to the view that ‘Black men are sexual predators’, is racially reprehensible.

Frankie Boyle is suing the Daily Mirror for calling him a ‘racist comedian’.

Birmingham’s Bishop Jon Jackson: ‘We will Vote’

in

The normally quietly spoken Bishop Jackson from the New Testament Church of God in Birmingham, got angry. In a sermon that was to kick start Black-led churches encouraging their congregations to register to vote Bishop Jackson said:

Policing priorities for Black communities

in

Due to lack of resources there will only be a few debates in the run up to the Police Commissioner elections in November that will be asking, ‘What are the priorities for Black Communities in this crucial regional and national debate about policing?'.

Cameron: "Britain on the rise" - but for whom?

in

 

In his address to the Conservative Party conference Prime Minister, David Cameron said it was the government's mission to unlock the potential of all the British people and build an "aspiration nation". 

He boldly exclaimed that,

"the Conservative party is for everyone: North and South, black or white, straight or gay".

He went on to call for an end to the "toxic culture of low expectation" which he accused the left of applying to the disadvantaged.

BME women suffer gross gender and ethnic penalty in workplace

in

While a demonstrable gender agenda has continued to make noise across the media and in Parliament in recent years, the category of “Women” persistently fails to take into account the full gamut of diversity that exists within that word. BME women or disabled women rarely have a stake in the gender equality camp. When it comes to employment, certain groups of ethnic minority women are among the first to bear the brunt of the economic downturn, undoing the progressive movements of the last fifteen years.

Ireland must confront its racial prejudice

in

We need political leadership to stamp out racism. Racism is an unacceptable reality in Ireland. A new survey has now identified it as an issue within the public sector. Courage is required on the part of the Government to address this issue.

The Afiya Trust bids farewell to Patrick Vernon

in


The Afiya Trust, a national charity that works to reduce inequalities in health and social care provision for people from BME communities bids farewell to its Chief Executive Patrick Vernon.

Vernon is leaving the charity after nearly four years of leading the trust’s work. During his time with The Afiya Trust, he brought his extensive knowledge of the agenda to a wider audience, travelling across the country highlighting the health disparities which BME communities experience.

Diane Abbott: Black Child Achievement Awards

in


This year’s London Schools and Black Child Academic Achievement Awards will take place on 10 October at the House of Commons.

The event will be hosted by Diane Abbott, shadow minister and Labour MP for Hackney North and Stoke Newington.

Amongst the celebrities confirmed to attend the event are legendary newscaster, Sir Trevor Macdonald, Olympic British silver-medallist Christine Ohuruogu, and chart topping rapper Wretch 32.

Marvin Rees: Labour Party conference special

in


In what was the most important speech of his young political life, OBV alumni Marvin Rees was given a standing ovation at the Labour Party Conference last week.

Marvin who is the Labour party candidate in the fight to become the first directly elected Mayor for Bristol was asked to give the speech by way of introducing the Labour Party leader Ed Miliband.

Knowing that the UK and the world’s media would be watching - in part because they were waiting for the Labour leader- Marvin gave a humble, moving, yet upbeat and confident performance.

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