News

The day that changed the World

in

We all remember exactly where we were on that most shocking infamous day. The world as we knew it literally came crashing down with a level of fear not known in Western Europe since the second World War.

On that fateful day I’d driven to Westminster to visit the Directors of YOUGOV.com - Stephan Shakespeare, and Nadhim Zahawi, who is now a member of Parliament for Stratford on Avon. It was commonplace to drive in and out of central London back then when there was no congestion charge.

Thousands attend Mark Duggan funeral

in

Thousands lined the streets of Tottenham to pay tribute to Mark Duggan, the man shot dead by police in early August.

His family had expected up to a thousand mourners, instead, many thousands came out in no small measure, to pay their respects but also to serve notice on the police and the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) that their role in this, particularly the ‘misinformation’ after the shooting, needs to be thoroughly investigated.

Baha Mousa's torture at the hands of British soldiers

in

The armed forces are going through its darkest periods following a landmark inquiry into the death of Iraqi civilian Baha Mousa by British soldiers.

Around 19 soldiers from the 1st Battalion the Queen’s Lancashire Regiment (1QLR) were found to have inflicted an “appalling episode of serious gratuitous violence” on father-of-two Mousa who died in their custody in 2003.

Racist crimes still a concern despite fall in figures

in

The number of racist incidents across England and Wales may have fallen according to the latest Home Office figures released yesterday but there is still a big problem in certain parts of the country.

The figures showed that the number of reported incidents fell by seven per cent in 2010 compared to the previous year - 54,872 incidences in 2008/9 which fell to 51,187 in 2010/11.

Calls grow for Rooney Rule in football

in

There are growing calls to follow America's lead and bring in the Rooney Rule to encourage more Black managers in the beautiful game. Football has come a long way in this country, embracing different communities and nationalities on the pitch.

Every week, we're mesmerised by South American playmakers, Spanish tacticians and skillful Africans who all add a flavour to the physical nature of English football.

Funeral of Mark Duggan

in

The funeral of Mark Duggan who was shot dead last month by police will take place tomorrow (September 9).

The service will start at 11am at the New Testament Church Of God, Arcadian Garden, Wood Green N22 5AA. Mr Duggan will later be buried at Wood Green Cemetery, Wolves Lane N22.

Mark Duggan died on August 4 from a single gunshot wound to the chest after the taxi he was travelling in was intercepted by police in Tottenham Hale as part of a pre-planned operation to arrest him.

Happy festivities: Lord Ganesha

in

There will be colourful celebrations in many cities across India, here in the UK and in other parts of the world as Hindus celebrate the festival of one its most revered Gods, Lord Ganesha, the Elephant God.

In India, some rituals will see statues of their God immersed in water, others will see beautiful choreographed dances. All devotees will enjoy great feasting.

In my home town of Leicester, there will no expense spared on lavish celebrations to a God that above all, brings hope to many that things can be better.

Ubele Initiative - it's good to talk

in

Action speak louder than words but it is words and dialogue which can help initiate change and that is the focus of an event to hold an open dialogue in the Black community later this month.

The Ubele initiative is hoping to bring together different generations from the African and Caribbean community to talk about the work that needs to be done between the elders and the youngsters so the community remains strong and viable over the next 30 years.

The art of parenting

in

In these troubled times that have seen the focus turn to the ‘family’, or lack of it Dr David Nieta explores what we might learn from our African ancestors.

A visit to the British Museum is not complete without a proper viewing of the African Statue of Senenmut and Neferure. The statue, although in a strange land, survives and conveys to us a vital song on the precious principles of parenting. Here I present my own thoughts and learning on the subject of parenting through my interaction with this amazing piece of African art.

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