Black History Month events

Date and Time: 
Wed, 16/10/2019 - 00:19 - Wed, 01/01/2020 - 00:19

 

Croydon Museum Windrush Exhibition
12/06/2019 - 31/10/2019, Tuesday to Saturday

Venue:
London

Details:
This Croydon Windrush Exhibition uses artefacts donated by members of the generation itself. The artefacts from the 40s, 50s and 60s will be on display in a recreated Caribbean-style front room outfitted with relics such as the paraffin heater, Blue –Spot Gram and the wallpaper of the time. The “We Came Here Before The Windrush” timeline is a focal point of the exhibition and shows the relevance of the topic all the way back to Roman times. The exhibition is part of a longer season of Windrush celebrations.

Additionally, there is a rolling video film with a calypso soundtrack, vinyl retro records from calypsonian Lord Kitchener, Sunday morning music from Jim Reeves, party sounds from Prince Buster, gospel from Andy Miller & Ranny Williams & retro records from the 40s-60s.

Contact:
www.croydonwindrush.org

aitwindrush@gmail.com

 

Windrush: Portrait of a Generation opens at Fairfield Halls
19 Sept 2019 to Jan 2020

Venue:
London

Details:
This September, Windrush: Portrait of a Generation, a major exhibition documenting the lives and traditions of the ‘Windrushers’ who settled in South London, will play an important part in the programme of launch events taking place at Fairfield Halls, Croydon’s newly-refurbished state of the art cultural complex.

The stunning photo-story, received widespread acclaim when it was first exhibited for a limited time at the Oxo Gallery on the South Bank last year. Photographed by award-winning social documentary photographer Jim Grover, the exhibition comprises some 60 predominantly black and white photographs and accompanying narratives from many of the individuals featured.The photographs are themed into groups of photo-stories that, together, encompass the daily lives of the Windrush generation including; community clubs; customs, dancing; faith; family gatherings; the Jamaican home; service to the mother country; funerals; and ‘Nine Night’ (a tradition which marks the passing of a loved one).

The exhibition leads with an opening portrait and personal story from Alford Gardner, now aged 93 and one of the few surviving passengers from the original Empire Windrush voyage. To co-incide with Black History Month this October, Gardner will be making a personal appearance at the Fairfield Halls exhibition to meet and talk with visitors.

Contact:
www.fairfield.co.uk/whats-on/windrush

 

A Black & British History: The Jamaican Slaves Who Abolished Slavery
Tuesday, 8 October 2019 from 6pm to 7.30pm

Venue:
Dulwich Library,London

Details:
Pioneering genealogist and author Paul Crooks captivates his audience with his account of how he traced two of his African forebears. They were captured of the West Coast of Africa and enslaved on a sugar plantation in Jamaica, 200 years ago.When researching his ancestry, Paul Crooks discovered his Great Great Great Grandfather walked free from a sugar plantation in Jamaica in 1838. Paul wanted to know what lay behind the decision to free the enslaved people of the Caribbean.In this talk, Paul will implicate his ancestors in Jamaica’s Baptist War

Contact:
www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/a-black-british

 

Celebrating Black History & Craft Fair
Saturday 26th October, 12:00 to 16:00

Venue:
Stoke Newington Methodist Church, London

Details:
This event is open to the community, to come together, to learn and celebrate black history. There will be local businesses, organisations, charities designers & artist providing, community information, stalls, illustrative arts, crafts, products and decorative items.

Contact:
Suzanne Asphall, 07956905730
designsbysuzanne01@hotmail.com

 

Slavery, Memory And Reparations
14 October 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm

Venue:
Museum of London

Details:
Using memory scholarship, Professor Olivette Otele will examine how the history and memory of enslavement shaped questions of identity and citizenship in Europe. In Africa, debates about the origins of exclusion in stratified post-slavery societies have been challenging the mechanisms of marginalisation of people of slave descent. In those contexts, the notion of collective memory is a useful tool to understand demands for reparatory justice, and how these can contradict regional or national policies based on the commoditisation of the colonial past.

Contact:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/slavery-memory-and-reparations-tickets-67241656605

 

Exhibition: Black Women in the Eyes of Maya Angelou
Tue 1 Oct 19 - Tue 29 Oct 19
Mon-Fri 9am-6pm, Sat 10.30am-5pm

Venue:
Brady Arts Centre Exhibition Space, London

Details:
As part of Black History Month, Saudha in partnership with the Gronthee is bringing a visual interpretation of poet Maya Angelou's feminist poetry through some stunning photography of Black Women in the eyes of Maya Angelou by an award winning photographer Pablo Khaled. Pablo Khaled has taken stunning images to interpret the words according to the dictation of the verses of poetry to portray the emotions of rebellion, beauty, insolence, insurgency, capability and power.

Contact:
Tel : 020 7364 7900

 

Historical Talks Throughout Black History Month
Tue 1 Oct 19 - Wed 30 Oct 19

Venue:
Museum of London Docklands

Details:
Join us for a month of free historical talks and tours as we explore black history in Britain. Learn more about London’s involvement in transatlantic slavery, discover the lives of Black Londoners in 18th Century London, hear the stories of the people who arrived on the Windrush and much more.

Contact:
http://www.museumoflondon.org.uk/docklands

 

Tracing Black Ancestry: Secrets of the 1817 Slave Registers Uncovered
Sat 19 Oct 19 14:00 – 16:00

Venue:
Idea Store, Whitechapel              

Details:
Trailblazing author and family historian Paul Crooks was told that it would be impossible to trace records of slave-ownership let alone his African ancestors enslaved on plantations in Jamaica. In the 1990s, undeterred, he embarked on a journey of discovery that led from suburban North London to Jamaica and ultimately back to the Gold Coast of Africa; an effort that has brought him international recognition for his breakthroughs in African Caribbean genealogy research.

Come and find out about Paul’s journey, how he uncovered the potential of the Slave Registers for exploring Caribbean ancestry and tracing African roots. Also how he traced his African forebears enslaved on a sugar plantation in Jamaica, 200 years ago. This talk will be done by the same scholar featured in ‘A Black & British History: The Jamaican Slaves Who Abolished Slavery’

Contact:
www.ideastore.co.uk

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